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Jordans School

A Small School with a Big Heart, guiding our children to becoming kind and courageous citizens.

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Welcome to

Jordans School

A Small School with a Big Heart, guiding our children to becoming kind and courageous citizens.

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YR FOXES 2020-2021

Week 3

 

PE

 

We enjoyed our first football coaching session on Friday. The children really enjoyed it and I heard them say "This is like a real football match!"

 

It would help if your child could come into school wearing their trainers on Friday and as we are outside all weathers, they need jogging bottoms in their PE bag.

 

Maths

 

This week we have been looking at patterns. Being able to recognise, continue and create a pattern is an early skill, which underpins our number system. Patterns are at the heart of math. The ability to recognize and create patterns help us make predictions based on our observations; this is an important skill in math. Understanding patterns help prepare children for learning complex number concepts and mathematical operations. 

 

We looked at ABAB patterns, such a log, stick, log, stick, and ABC patterns, such a leaf, stick, log, leaf, stick, log. 

 

It would be great if you could have a go at home too. Please e mail me in any photos.

 

Literacy

 

We also looked at and matched rhyming words, such a bat, cat, mat and hop, bop, mop. We continued string of rhyming words too.

 

Rhyme is important to emergent literacy and learning to read because it teaches children about the language. Rhyming helps children learn about word families such as let, met, pet, wet, and get. Rhyming also teaches children the sound of the language. Other important skills include phonological awareness, the ability to notice and work with the sounds in language. Rhymes help children with phonemic awareness, which is the knowledge that phonemes are the smallest units of sounds that make up words. This awareness leads to reading and writing success.

 

Rhyme also teaches children who are learning to read about the patterns and structures of both spoken and written language. Songs and rhymes expose your child to the rhythm of the language. This will help them read with some animation in their voice instead of just a monotone. Rhyme also prepares children to make predictions while learning words and gives them crucial decoding skills.

 

How Can You Teach Rhyming At Home?

 

Matching Pictures : Find pairs of pictures that rhyme. Place one set of pictures in a container and all of the rhyming pairs in another container. Have the children draw out two pictures (one from each container) and ask them if the two words rhyme. If they don’t, continue pulling out pictures from the second container until the child finds a matching rhyme. Continue with all remaining cards.

 

“Did You Ever See?” : Sing the following lyrics to the tune “If You’re Happy and You Know It.” Did you ever see a (cat) in a (hat)? Did you ever see a (cat) in a (hat)? No, I never, no, I never, no, I never, no I never, No, I never saw a (cat) in a (hat). Repeat with duck/truck, dog/log, ring/swing, rake/cake, or any other rhyming pairs. After singing these verses, challenge the children to come up with their own rhyming pairs to create new verses.

 

Active Reading: Read stories with rhymes. Talk about the rhyming words and how they sound the same. Mention that they rhyme because the ends of the words sound the same. Recite the rhymes yourself, leaving off the rhyming word. Have the children fill in the missing word

 

Nursery Rhyme Time: Have the children listen to and recite nursery rhymes. Talk about the rhyming words and how they sound the same. Mention that they rhyme because the ends of the words sound the same. After the children are familiar with a particular nursery rhyme, recite the rhyme but leave off the rhyming word. Have the children fill in the missing word.

 

Week 2

The children have settled so well. We are so proud of them making new friends, exploring the inside and outside and all of the new activities.

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